8 Track , Cassette and Stereo

13Apr

Music of the 1960’s and 1970’s was saved on an odd piece of recording equipment, the 8-track tape.  Formally called Stereo 8, it was cutting-edge technology.  April 11 is National 8-Track Day and can be celebrated by paying tribute to the Beatles and the White Album, their first record on 8-track (and I think it’s fair to say, if you have that 8-track it might be worth a pretty Penny Lane).  Jackson Browne gave a nod to the technology of the time in “Stay,” as you might recall. But alas, the great 8-tracks as well as cassettes are no more.

Something else that has all but disappeared from our landscape, smothered by mp3, is the good old-fashioned record store selling vinyl—touch me, feel me, play me. There is nothing like holding an album, feeling the groove, so to speak. Of course, there are still some record stores, fun dusty places where an audiophile can go on a treasure hunt and maybe find that lost piece of vinyl from childhood. When I moved from a very large place to a very small place I was forced to sell off over 300 mint-condition albums to the stores that bought and sold used records.  I discovered there is still a big market out there for collectors of vinyl and also saw that vinyl is making a comeback and for good reason. There is no sound like it and another cause to celebrate. The seventh annual Record Store Day is April 19.

Last week I talked about the Internet saving radio by giving it more life. Your local station is now anywhere you are, live and screaming in your car. If you missed that one, including my review of Twenty Feet from Stardom, check it out here http://creative-treehouse.com/internet-saved-the-radio-world/.

There’s more on the magic that once was, a few words on the 2014 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees, and other random thoughts at Rambling Harbor.  Stop in and give a listen.

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