Strange Days and Punks for Salvation

27Jul

My mind sometimes befuddles me. I don’t know why I think the things I do, but I think them anyway. Here are a few from the past week.

In 1980, poet and punk musician Jim Carroll wrote “People Who Died,” which was on his album Catholic Boy.  Ironically, the song could have been titled “People Who Died  in July,” including punk rocker Tommy Ramone, who wrote a song called “Too Tough To Die.” It still bothers me, as I said in last week’s blog, that his death went largely unnoticed, as did the passing of Johnny Winter and Muddy Waters.

As the list grows on, here’s another name for you: Dick Jones. You probably wouldn’t know him if he were sitting next to you, but you have heard his voice many times. Dick Jones was the voice of Pinocchio, and he died on July 7. James Garner, the “Tall Dark Stranger” named Maverick, died July 19.

Under “Man, is that a strange day, indeed,” we can post that a pine tree, planted near L.A.'s Griffith Observatory in 2004 in honor of George Harrison, was killed by his band's namesake insect. The Beatle's memorial tree was killed by beetles! Harrison's pine had grown to more than 10 feet tall by 2013, and the good news is the tree will be replaced, time and place to be announced.

In other bizarre and unexplained news, Russia seems to be sinking. Russian scientists conducted a primary examination of a giant sinkhole in the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous District. There was no dangerous radiation detected on the site, and the scientists, who arrived to examine the sinkhole on the instructions of the regional governor, said it appeared “as a result of a natural phenomenon, the nature of which is impossible to establish yet.” Personally, I’m expecting the four horseman of the apocalypse to burst out of there in a frenzy of flaming glory and head directly to the Westboro Baptist Church, consisting of a collection of hate-mongering protesters who have targeted everyone from the singer Lorde to Brad Paisley, of all people. Recently this bunch of ghoulish protesters met their match with a bunch of punks. They planned on protesting at a “Panic! At The Disco” concert, announcing plans to picket the pop-punk band's Sunday night show in Kansas City, Missouri, but Brendon Urie of the group retaliated. He said that for every member of the Westboro church who showed up he would donate $20 to the Human Rights Campaign, America’s largest civil rights organization, working to achieve lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender equality at home, at work, and in the community. Brendon said, “This is pretty much the perfect way to render the protesters' hateful intentions useless” and would actually be useful and raise money for a good cause.

In the podcast, you’ll hear a few minutes about Ted Nugent as well as other topics. Come on shore and give a listen.

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